Biden’s Pick for Secretary of State Opposed Labeling Iran’s Revolutionary Guard ‘Terrorists’ – Trump Labeled Them in 2019


As Joe Biden begins his transition to a possible presidency, his pick for Secretary of State, Antony Blinken faces more scrutiny of his record. Earlier I noted that as Deputy Secretary of State, Blinken had met with then-Vice President Joe Biden’s troubled son, Hunter, twice in 2015, at the time Hunter had been named to the board of the Ukrainian energy company Bursima.

Senators are still waiting for official records of those meetings from the State Department to determine possible conflicts of interest or national security concerns.

Now, in a sign of whether Biden intends to return to the dangerously failed appeasement strategy of the Obama-Biden team regarding Iran, Blinken’s views on the now officially designated terrorist group, Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) are resurfacing.

As Fox News reported, in 2017, when the Trump administration was considering the terrorist designation for the IRGC, Blinken said on CNN that he opposed the designation out of fear of retribution by Iran. This despite the fact that the State Department was already describing the IRGC as the leading sponsor of terrorism. Blinken explained:

If there’s a formal designation as a terrorist organization, I think there is going to be blowback. That’s exactly why the Bush administration and the Obama administration, while using other sanctions against individual members, leaders or the IRGC, resisted designating the organization.

Blinken suggested instead using existing sanctions “without sticking it in their eye publicly in a way that might actually blow up reaction and that endangers our troops,” noted Fox.

Thankfully, Trump ignored such concerns and designated the IRGC a terrorist group in 2019 and followed this by his bold surgical missile strike that took out the IRGC’s Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani in January 2020.

The Quds Force is the dedicated terror wing of the IRGC primarily responsible for clandestine operations outside Iran. The Iranian regime, other than a mostly symbolic rocket attack against US bases in Iraq, has since been relatively quiet.

If Blinken becomes Secretary of State expect the Obama-Biden appeasement of Iran to return, along with more terrorism and, as I have reported, the much-increased likelihood of conflict between Israel and Iran.


Paul Crespo

Paul Crespo is the Managing Editor of American Defense News. A defense and national security expert, he served as a Marine Corps officer and as a military attaché with the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) at US embassies worldwide. Paul holds degrees from Georgetown, London, and Cambridge Universities. He is also CEO of SPECTRE Global Risk, a security advisory firm, and President of the Center for American Defense Studies, a national security think tank.

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WRodgers
WRodgers
1 month ago

I expect a lot of things to change in the Biden admin. (if that happens). I expect there to be such a big change the threats to America will come from outside the states to inside the states. Those attacks on the inside will be targeted toward the republicans. Many threats have already been made. Just keep and eye out and be prepared.

Tom
Tom
1 month ago

Facing US withdrawal from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, Israel is making historic treaty agreements with Sunni States in preparation for a potential war with Iran. The Saudis and Israel had a tacit agreement when ISIS and Free Syrian Army Jihadis were threatening Damascus. Israel wouldn’t intervene as long as Jihadis, who were Sunnis, stayed out of the Bekka Valley. But, Putin preempted, ending Obama’s and Saudi’s wet dreams. The region needs a Marshall Plan to rebuild the war torn nations of Southwest Asia. Treaties based on mutual economic development are much better and longer lasting than border treaties. Just ask Poland.


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