Pro-China Olympic ‘Traitor’ Eileen Gu Should Not be Part of US Olympics Bid

Photo by Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport via Flickr

The United States is making a bid for the 2030 or 2034 Winter Olympics. Naturally, the bid committee wants prominent American Olympians to be part of that process. Skier Eileen Gu should not be among them.

Gu is a California-born skier who won two gold medals and a silver medal at the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing. Those victories would make her an ideal “athlete representative” for a U.S. bid for the games, a position she has already been given, according to the committee. But Gu did not win those medals for America. She won them for the host nation, Communist China, earning the adoration of Chinese fans and making tens of millions of dollars off of Chinese endorsement deals in the process.

Choosing to shun the Stars and Stripes to compete under another country’s flag is not a major issue in and of itself, though it would make Gu a poor choice to be an “ambassador” (her words) for a U.S. Olympic bid. But the fact that she chose to represent China instead is a major problem.

China used the 2022 Winter Olympics as a propaganda campaign. Over the past few years, the country has carried out a genocide of the Uyghurs in Xinjiang, clamped down on pro-freedom protesters in Hong Kong, and repeatedly threatened to invade and conquer Taiwan. With help from the International Olympic Committee, which has become infested with Chinese propagandists, China tried to rehabilitate its image on the global stage by having a token Uyghur light the Olympic torch, while Chinese Communist Party mouthpieces boasted about leading the U.S. in gold medals (up until the moment they lost on the final day). Gu was a willing agent in those propaganda efforts.

Read more at Washington Examiner

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VirginiaAmalia
VirginiaAmalia
1 month ago

how ar you

Paul Wallace
Paul Wallace
1 month ago

how ar you


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