Juneteenth – The Day a Great Republican President Freed the Slaves (in Texas?)

Phil Horton via Flickr

ANALYSIS – While the Left wants to make the heretofore little-known date of June 19, 1965, a new holiday to bash America due to its partial history of slavery, Juneteenth (as it is now known) is not the date slavery ended in the United States.

Or the day the last slaves were freed.

Sorry Mr. (Ill-informed) Science Guy holding a pocket Constitution he clearly has never read.

Juneteenth is actually only a day to celebrate a great Republican president’s historic message freeing the slaves finally reaching the Confederate state of Texas.

That great Republican president was of course, Abraham Lincoln, and his historic message was the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863.

As the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war, Lincoln’s proclamation declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebellious states “are, and henceforward shall be free.”

So, January 1, 1963, could be a great day to celebrate. But despite Lincoln’s’ message, the reality or ending slavery took a while longer.

So, what exactly is Juneteenth about?

Well, this latest federal holiday, created last year when President Biden signed legislation that made Juneteenth a federal holiday in the wake of the Black Lives Matters’ (BLM) 2020 ‘summer of love’ and riots, marks the day residents of Galveston received General Orders No. 3, which freed slaves in Texas.

On June 19, 1865, about two months after the Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Va., Gordon Granger, a Union general, arrived in Galveston, Texas, the last remaining Confederate state, to inform enslaved black Americans of their freedom and that the Civil War had ended.

That is the day slavery officially ended in the Confederate South.

However, that wasn’t the end of slavery in America. That didn’t come until a full six months later on December 6, 1865.

And that is another great day to celebrate.

That is the date the last American slaves in two remaining Union states (Kentucky which was nominally part of the Union and Biden’s home state of Delaware) were officially freed when the 13th Amendment was ratified and officially proclaimed.

That’s the real date slavery fully ended in America.

So, while Juneteenth has some significance for Texas and the Confederacy, it’s neither the day announcing the end of slavery by a great Republican President on January 1, 1963, nor the date slavery was finally ended in the entire United States on December 6, 1865.

It is the date Lincoln’s freeing of the slaves finally reached Texas though. The last Confederate state standing. ADN

Paul Crespo is the Managing Editor of American Defense News. A defense and national security expert, he served as a Marine Corps officer and as a military attaché with the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) at US embassies worldwide. Paul holds degrees from Georgetown, London, and Cambridge Universities. He is also CEO of SPECTRE Global Risk, a security advisory firm, and President of the Center for American Defense Studies, a national security think tank. - paulcrespo.substack.com - PAULCRESPO.COM


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